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CicarboTM Graphene Characterization and Analysis


auriga brochureIn spite of its simple atomic structure, graphene has not only been notoriously difficult to make, but equally difficult to characterize. Most standard characterization techniques are pushed to their instrumental limitations to quantify the structure, size distribution, and relevant physical properties of various grades of graphene particles. Currently, no standards exist within the industry for quantifying the relevant properties of different grades of graphene, precisely for the two reasons cited above: graphene has been difficult to produce at the industrial scale and has proven very hard to characterize accurately. Indeed, ASTM International has not yet even begun to develop protocols for graphene characterization and analysis, and it is only within the past few years that any attempts have been made at establishing a basis of nomenclature for denoting various grades of graphene [Carbon, vol. 65, p. 1, 2013].

 

At Celtig, we have devoted a great deal of effort to characterizing our products as completely as possible. Below, we present a sampling of information derived from hundreds of hours spent studying our materials using the most sophisticated techniques currently available for such analyses. Characterizations have been performed primarily in-house, but with independent verification from several external entities, as noted below. Detailed technical data sheets summarizing the results of these analyses can be found using the menu to the right for various grades of CicarboTM graphene. Besides simply presenting the results of these analyses, we will also devote some time to discussing the various characterization techniques as well as the advantages and limitations associated with each one. Only by understanding the mechanical limitations of the various instruments is it possible to understand why the physiochemical properties of graphene can exhibit such broad ranges of values from one published journal article to the next. In so doing, we can hopefully clear up some of the confusion surrounding contradictory characterizations of this material and also obtain a certain level of understanding as to why graphene has proven so difficult to analyze.

 

Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)

Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA)

Raman Spectroscopy (RS)

Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM)

Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM)

Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS)

X-Ray Diffraction (XRD)

Download the CicarboTM Graphene Characterization and Analysis Marquee_images

 

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